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Book Hollywood Censored: Morality Codes, Catholics, and the Movies (Cambridge Studies in the History of Mass Communication)

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Hollywood Censored: Morality Codes, Catholics, and the Movies (Cambridge Studies in the History of Mass Communication)

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    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Hollywood Censored: Morality Codes, Catholics, and the Movies (Cambridge Studies in the History of Mass Communication).pdf | Language: ENGLISH
    Gregory D. Black(Author)

    Book details


After a series of sex scandals rocked the film industry in 1922, movie moguls hired Will Hays to clear the image of movies. Hays tried a variety of ways to regulate movies before adopting what became known as the production code. Written in 1930 by a St Louis priest, the code stipulated that movies stress proper behaviour, respect for government, and 'Christian values'. The Catholic Church reinforced these efforts by launching its Legion of Decency in 1934. Intended to force Hays and Hollywood to censor films, the Legion of Decency engineered the appointment of Joseph Breen as head of the Production Code Administration. For the next three decades, Breen, Hays, and the Catholic Legion of Decency virtually controlled the content of all Hollywood films.

'Well-written account of film censorship.'Heythrop Journal

3.4 (9384)
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Book details

  • PDF | 348 pages
  • Gregory D. Black(Author)
  • Cambridge University Press (25 Aug. 1994)
  • English
  • 4
  • Society, Politics & Philosophy

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Review Text

  • By JTL on 2 February 2012

    Despite the rather trashy-looking cover, this is a book of excellent scholarship. Although it's detailed enough to be of use to those who have studied this topic in depth, it is also presented in a straightforward way so that the layman can understand it too. If any Catholics reading this are concerned that the Church takes a battering, there is no need - both sides of the debate are presented fairly (though sometimes you do share the frustration of those stuck between church and studio). This is a very good and interesting book, and I recommend it highly to anyone interested in the films of the Golden Age.


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